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Noteworthy Evidence, Guidelines, Recommendations, and Tools in Pediatric Nutrition from 2023

 

Are you finding it hard to stay up-to-date?

We’re here to help. Here’s a roundup of what caught our attention in 2023. You’ll find the latest evidence, guidelines, recommendations, and tools so you stay current, and can update your practice as needed.

 

1: The North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition Position on the Role of the Registered Dietitian Nutritionist in the Care of the Pediatric Patient With Chronic Gastrointestinal Diseases

Published in March 2023

Every dietitian can think of countless ways we improve the care of patients with GI diseases. This position paper from NASPGHAN is the first publication to review the evidence for the role of the Registered Dietitian in the care of pediatric patients with GI conditions.

If you need evidence to support your role, obtain more funding or time, or simply want to pat yourself on the back for the positive impact you make in this patient population, this is the paper you need.

Access the position paper HERE

 

2: Guidelines for parenteral nutrition in preterm infants: The American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition

Published on 23 August 2023

An interdisciplinary group answered 12 questions around parenteral macronutrient doses, lipid injectable emulsion (ILE) composition, and clinically relevant outcomes, including parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD), early childhood growth, and neurodevelopment. They reviewed the literature between 2001 and 2023. Expert opinion was provided where the quality of the evidence was very low.

Those of you who have been working with preterm infants in the NICU setting will likely not find these guidelines earth shattering, however, they can reassure you that you are making the safest recommendations in this vulnerable population.

Access the guidelines HERE

 

3: Blenderized tube feedings: ASPEN Practice Recommendations

Published on 03 October 2023

Are you following any patients on blenderized tube feedings? Then you’ll love this new blenderized tube feeding practice recommendations tool developed by the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN). It’s a simple 4-page document that goes through common blenderized tube feeding questions and sums up the best practice recommendations. If you’ve ever wondered what the evidence says about jejunal blenderized tube feedings, type of enteral access device that can be safely used, hang time and cleaning practices – this tool has you covered.

Check out their website to access more information on their blenderized tube feedings tool kit: https://www.nutritioncare.org/Guidelines_and_Clinical_Resources/Enteral_Nutrition_Resources/.

Do you still have burning questions around blenderized tube feedings in pediatrics? Hit reply and let us know.

Access your blenderized tool HERE

 

4: WHO Guideline for complementary feeding of infants and young children 6-23 months of age

Published on 16 October 2023

The World Health Organization has reviewed their 2005 guidelines. They have summed up their work with 7 recommendations for feeding children between the ages of 6 and 23 months, their categories including: continued breastfeeding, milks for children fed milks other than breastmilk, age of introduction of complementary foods, dietary diversity, unhealthy foods and beverages, nutrient supplements/fortified food products and responsive feeding.

These guidelines are intended to be worldwide recommendations. Hence, you need to carefully consider what resources are available in your geographical area and the best practice evidence for the young child you are counseling.

What do you think of these recommendations?

Access the updated WHO guidelines HERE

 

5: Health Canada Dietary Reference Intake Tables – Updated

Published on 18 December 2023

For the Canadian Dietitians. The Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) have been updated to reflect changes over the years. The last DRI table was released in 1997! Gasp. If you’re like us, you’ll likely be printing the new DRI tables for your binder, or you’ll be downloading a copy to reference. The new tables reflect the changes made to calcium and vitamin D in 2011, potassium and sodium in 2019, and energy in 2023.

Access the revised DRIs HERE

 

Feeling overwhelmed around weaning, prevention of allergies and meeting iron requirements in infants?

If you’re interested in learning more about infant nutrition, join our wait list for our flagship course: Infant Nutrition Essentials in the fall of 2024 – where we help you gain the knowledge and skills you need to see infants confidently.

Join our Infant Nutrition Essentials Waitlist Here
What are we up to right now at Nutrition Masterclass:

👉 Stay tuned for our 2024 Picky Eating Series coming out next month!!!

We’d love to hear from you. Hit reply and let us know what you think.

Cheers

Charlene and Julie

P.S. Did you know we run a private Facebook group for dietitians interested in pediatric nutrition? It’s called “Pediatric Dietitians – Newbies to Masters” and it has almost 4000 members! Join our group by clicking HERE!

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